Stressed? Try this Simple but Effective Breathing Technique

Here is a very simple breathing and relaxation technique recommended by us at Absolute Yoga (Liverpool).

 

“When the breath wanders the mind also is unsteady.  But when the breath is calmed the mind too will be still and the yogi achieves long life. Therefore, one should learn to control the breath”. Hatha Yoga Pradipika

 

 

1. In a quiet space, with the body in a relaxed position and the eyes closed, begin to count silently in your mind how long it takes you to make a full inhalation and a full exhalation.

 

Pranayama2. Repeat the process but this time trying to enhance the breath by expanding the count and slowing down the breath. For example, if at first you inhaled for a count of three or four then try to expand this count to five or six and then repeat again, with each inhalation going further and further until you can go no higher with the count. Repeat the process with the exhalation. 

 

3, The breath will slow down and when the breath is calm, the mind is calm. Do not let the mind wander off, keep your eyes closed and let your mind’s eye focus on a ball of white light.

 

4. As you increase the breath count, keep the mind’s eye focused on the ball of white light but allow the ball to become smaller and smaller. Allow yourself to relax and, with practice and concentration, you may find you move into meditation. 

 

Want to try a class at Absolute Yoga (Liverpool)? The first class is free for new students and then choose from…

 

Special Offers

 Information for New Students at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool)

 

  • Please see here for a list of classes which we recommend for your first time on the mat with us
  • You may also wish to read our FAQ on yoga and Pilates 
  • Your first class is free and then you can choose from one of the new member introductory offers: £30 for 30 days or £40 for 40 days

  • See here to book a class

  • For class descriptions, see here

Follow us on…       

 

                                                                   

How to Book a Class at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool)
Email: info@absoluteyogacrosby.co.uk
Call: 0151 928 1029
Book a class online here

 

Share

You don’t “do” yoga: you live it

 

 

It is getting to that time of year again where Christmas is just around the corner and we are all getting busier and busier by the day. Soon we will be finishing work and then heading straight out to do some Christmas shopping, watch Christmas plays and/or catch up with friends for festive drinks and good food.

 

The routine goes out the window and suddenly it is difficult to find your way to the yoga mat. Indeed, it is common at this time of year to hear the yoga students at Absolute Yoga (Liverpool) say “I feel terrible, I haven’t done any yoga for weeks”. However, talking about yoga as something that you “do” is very much construct of Western society.

 

There is a common misconception held that yoga is about being bendy and flexing into some weird and wonderful postures. However, those postures are merely the physical expression of yoga which is known as the “asana” practice: one of the eight limbs of Ashtanga yoga described in the seminal yoga text, “The Yoga Sutras of Patañjali”. Indeed, only three of the book’s 196 sutras actually mention the asanas. Read more about the Eight Limbs of Yoga here.

 

Accordingly, over the next few weeks, when the festive season really kicks in, if you find that you cannot make it to your yoga mat then that just means that you will not be performing the physical aspect of yoga, limb three: the asana practice. However, you can still practise yoga by turning your attention to some of the other limbs and incorporating them into your everyday life. Here are a few examples which you could try:

 

 

Want to try a class at Absolute Yoga (Liverpool)? The first class is free for new students and then choose from…

 

Special Offers

 Information for New Students at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool)

 

  • Please see here for a list of classes which we recommend for your first time on the mat with us
  • You may also wish to read our FAQ on yoga and Pilates 
  • Your first class is free and then you can choose from one of the new member introductory offers: £20 for 20 days, £30 for 30 days or £40 for 40 days

  • See here to book a class

  • For class descriptions, see here

Follow us on…         

 

                                                                   

  

How to Book a Class at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool)
Email: info@absoluteyogacrosby.co.uk
Call: 0151 928 1029
Book a class online here

 

Share

Guest Blogger, Dan: Progress and Results So Far from Pilates and Tri-Dynamic Yoga

 

Forgive me I have sinned, I’ve had a vanity induced week away from the hot room…and in that time I’ve been able to take stock of where I am physically and also a few conversations I’ve had in and around Absolute Yoga.

 

Firstly, this past month has been my longest sustained period of yoga and the physical results are clear…

 

“I am trimmer around the waist and my arms and legs are stronger and more defined.”

 

Moreover I can now sustain through most of the classes and have been attempting to complete the more advanced options of each pose in Pilates along with heavier weights in Tri Dynamic Yoga. There has been some collapsing in a heap, but you don’t get to fly without bumping your ass a few times.

 

This did lead to a slight issue in one Tri Dynamic class while we were doing squats. The instruction was get as close to twenty reps as possible while holding your weights. So off I went at my own pace attempting to get to twenty, at around rep 11 or 12 I noticed in my periphery that someone was matching my pace. I continued, they continued, I slowed, they slowed. With no small effort I got to twenty at the same time as my nemesis, who it turns out was my reflection in a side mirror. Soft lad. Although he did motivate me on.

 

Allied to this, I have upped my protein intake, this was on the back of an overheard conversation between Fairy Yogamother and another student around what they were eating and also the slightly lethargic feeling I was experiencing in the evenings after a class. Salad alone wasn’t cutting it so following a class now I have scrambled eggs on toast and I make sure I get some lean meat in for my evening meal and I feel great for it!

 

“A quick squint at the Absolute Yoga website has shown me Rose’s blog on acid and alkaline foods, I’m going to try to incorporate some of her lessons into my diet too.”

 

I feel like the Tri Dynamic sessions are building my upper body while Pilates is improving my cardio stamina and legs. All classes provide excellent core work in my opinion, due in no small part to a lot of planking and variations on the plank. They complement each other well and to me the benefits are obvious.

 

I’ve missed my time away from the class this week and I’m eager to find out what I have retained in terms of ability and what i’ve lost in a week.

 

As always I’ll report back.

 

Namaste kids.

 

 

Want to try a class at Absolute Yoga (Liverpool)? The first class is free for new students and then choose from…

 

Special Offers

 Information for New Students at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool)

  • Please see here for a list of classes which we recommend for your first time on the mat with us
  • You may also wish to read our FAQ on yoga and Pilates 
  • Your first class is free and then you can choose from one of the new member introductory offers: £20 for 20 days, £30 for 30 days or £40 for 40 days

  • See here to book a class

  • For class descriptions, see here

Follow us on…         

                                                                   

  

How to Book a Class at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool)
Email: info@absoluteyogacrosby.co.uk
Call: 0151 928 1029
Book a class online here

Share

Seasonal Timetable at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool) from Monday 24th November 2014

 

Monday Monday (Studio 3)Tuesday WednesdayThursdayFriday Saturday
8.30am
Spin HIIT
30 mins
(Jennie)
9.00am
Hot Yoga Flow
60 Mins
(Michelle)
10.00am
Hot Pilates
60 Mins
(Jennie)
10.00am
Yin Yoga
(Kate)
10.00am
Hot Pilates
60 Mins
(Jennie)
10.00am
Warm Gentle Yoga
60 Mins
(Kate)
10.00am
Hot Pilates
60 Mins
(Jennie)
6.00pm
Spin HIIT
25 mins
(Angela)
6.00pm
Spin HIIT
25 mins
(Angela)
6.00pm
Candlelit Yoga
60 Mins
(Carli)
6.30pm
Hot Yoga Flow
60 Mins
(Carli)
6.45pm
Pilates Flow
60 mins
(Jennie)
6.30pm
Power Yoga
60 Mins
(Jennie)
6.30pm
Hot Yoga Flow
60 mins
(Helen)
6.30pm
Hot Yoga Flow
60 mins
(Jennie)
8.00pm
Candlelit Yoga
60 Mins
(Kate)
8.00pm
Barre
60 mins
(Laura)
8.00pm
Candlelit Yoga
60 Mins
(Helen)
8.00pm
Restorative Yoga
60 Mins
(Jennie/Kate)
6.30pm
Barre
60 mins
(Laura)

 Information for New Students at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool)

 

  • Please see here for a list of classes which we recommend for your first time on the mat with us
  • You may also wish to read our FAQ on yoga and Pilates 
  • Your first class is free and then you can choose from one of the new member introductory offers: £20 for 20 days, £30 for 30 days or £40 for 40 days

  • See here to book a class

  • For class descriptions, see here

 

 

Find us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram…

                                   

twitter_icon

facebook_icon

instagram_icon

 

 

Share

Guest Blogger, Dan: Yoga and Weights???

This week, Dan reviews our Tri-Dynamic Yoga Class…

 

Forgive me for I have sinned , I have been lazy. 

 

Obviously this is hardly a new phenomenon however, I came out of my most recent class, Hot Pilates, and felt that I hadn’t worked hard enough. This was new as I normally stagger down the stairs on unstable thighs, and jump into my car for a couple of minutes rest after the ordeal of said stairs. This time was different though and I found myself unhappy at the thought that I hadn’t pushed myself hard enough. I can’t put my finger on why I hadn’t gone hard enough, maybe it was because it was a Monday or the previous week I’d managed four classes, I don’t know. But I know this, I wouldn’t let it happen again.

 

Anyway, I promised a report on Tri-Dynamic, if my arms still work, and they do, so here it is. It’s Yoga with weights……

 

Want some more? Ok, it’s yoga with weights, and the teacher is the one and only Fairy Yogamother. The Fairy Yogamother who is now a qualified PT mentalist… maybe this wasn’t such a good idea after all. I had a quick read of the Absolute Yoga, Crosby website and their own words on what Tri-Dynamic was and the reasons behind the class, yoga imparts flexibility and in some cases hyper flexibility in joints but doesn’t always increase the muscle around the joints, over extending the joints can damage them if the  muscles can’t support the extension, like a castle built on sand.

 

So with a rough idea what the class was about I bounded into the room to be greeted by an extensive array of exercise equipment. The weights were to be expected, mostly kettlebells and other such unstable tools of torture. I didn’t expect the medicine balls, big bouncy balls or what can only be described as half a spacehopper and a step plank thingy, can you tell I don’t get to the gym much?

 

The mats are also laid out differently, to allow more room to lift (not swing, never swing) big lumps of iron about without fear of walloping any of your class mates no doubt. So you really do have a full range of motion and can follow the teachers instructions to the letter, this is of particular importance in Sun Salutation which includes in no particular order, jumping, waving, up dogs, down dogs and press ups. These all have yogic names that you will hear throughout your class along with bandas (controlled breathing I think) and the obligatory “use that heavier weight”.

 

And so to the weights, there’s no getting away from them. While you quietly meditate and begin to control your breathing at the beginning of the class, the teacher will distribute weights she feels match or slightly exceed your ability to you, so you awake to them like Christmas morning, but with less wrapping and bucks fizz. Invariably you’ll have two pairs, one for arm work, one for leg work, throughout the class these can be supplemented with the other apparatus to further push you. This is always done in the light and humorous way I’ve come to expect from our Fairy Yogamother, to me it feels like there is a bit more interaction in the class compared to pilates or fusion, this may be down to the size of the class, the teacher or the general approach but I’m quite sure I’d get a different response if I told Paula “no don’t wanna” like a troublesome toddler when presented with a heavier weight.

 

And so I was pushed to my limit, and a bit beyond in all manner of poses and stretches. It was hard but rewarding work and yet again I came out drenched in sweat, it is a serious workout. The class was closed with a period of meditation and when I looked up Fairy Yogamother was floating!!!! Okay once I got the sweat out of my eyes I found that she was perched on top of the space hopper, this was a feat in itself.

 

I also attended a mix of hot and regular pilates and I am feeling the benefits each and every time I go, I *think* we’ve moved away from leg work and onto core now, hopefully I’ll find out in the coming weeks if the classes move in cycles or if its my imagination but my legs feel much stronger than when I began and my core seems to be working harder now than ever before. In the last two weeks I’ve been to four classes each week, this in itself is an achievement for me and I hope I can continue my development.

 

Oh and I did a bakasananamanananabanana pose in my second class. In english its Crow Pose, in Downward Facing Fatboy its drunken crab doing a handstand.

 

Namaste kids.

 

STOP PRESS

 

Hot Pilates, sound.

 

Normal Temperature Pilates, sound.

 

Normal Tri-Dynamic, sound.

 

HOT TRI-DYNAMIC?!?!?!?!! This was unexpected and the hardest thing I’ve done in Crosby, apart from getting a piggy back off an iron man on the beach but that’s a different story. This was next level. I was expecting with the heat that things would be less dynamic than the previous Tri-Dynamic sessions, I think it might have actually been more dynamic, I sweated, I swore, I found a new and interesting way to complete table top while insulting the teacher. IT WAS BRILLIANT. It was yet another way to mix up the classes and work different elements of yourself in a different environment. Sweating has never been so fun, apart from that one time……

 

Extra Namaste kids. Get to class and get mobile

 

Read Dan’s previous blog here.

 

 

Tri-Dynamic Yoga at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool)

 

 

The first class is free for new students and then choose from…

 

Special Offers for New Students

 

 

 
How to Book a Class at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool)
Email: info@absoluteyogacrosby.co.uk
Call: 0151 928 1029
Book a class online here

 

Find us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram…

                                   

twitter_icon

facebook_icon

Share

Acid and Alkaline Eating by Rose Long

Rose Long is a Liverpool based Health Coach and Absolute Yoga practitioner. Rose has very kindly agreed to write a few guest articles for our studio in the area of health, well being and nutrition. Research suggests that the food you eat is approximately 85% responsible for factors such as body weight and overall health. Accordingly, read on: what Rose has to say is very interesting…

 

 

So, what’s the deal with acid and alkaline foods? There’s a growing trend that’s encouraging us to eat an alkaline diet…. is it just another fad? Well I’m sure it won’t be long before it’s eclipsed by the next hot health craze, but before it’s out of fashion it’s worth recognising the value at the heart of the trend. After all, recognising the importance of acid and alkaline foods is nothing new – traditional Chinese medicine was talking about it over two thousand years ago, and the Ayurvedic tradition was passing on this wisdom over 5,000 years ago.

 

As with so many health practices, the teaching at the heart of the acid/alkaline diet is balance. In the West our standard diet is tipped towards the acid end of the scale, as is our lifestyle. The foods we eat, the air we breathe, the toxins we absorb through our skin, the pesticides on our food and the stress we manage in our lives all factor into our body’s pH. The body is constantly striving to find a balance between acidity and alkalinity, measured by a pH.

 

There are acidic elements to our lives that we cannot control – air pollution being one of them. But we can choose what we eat and make a significant difference to the pH balance in our digestive system. Depending on the proportion of meat, dairy, grains (except millet and pseudo grains), sugar, alcohol and coffee you down in a day, will depend on just how acidic your diet is. Some people can happily consume an acidic diet their entire lives with no ill effect. You’ll see them in their late 80s smiling in their arm chairs, a cream cake in one hand, sherry in the other.   The rest of us aren’t so lucky.

 

In my youth I could eat just about anything you put in front of me and as long as tasted good, I didn’t give it a second thought. As I got older, I became aware that at times I was uncomfortably bloated after eating. Other times smelly wind meant it wasn’t just me that was aware something was up. Bloating, wind, indigestion, heartburn, fatigue, ulcers, candida, parasites, headaches and a low immune system can all be caused or aided by an acidic diet.

 

If you’re ready to lean away from acid forming foods, towards alkaline foods, the key to success is small steps. Any dramatic change that has you overhaul your entire diet is likely to work with a while, and then your enthusiasm will wear off, along side your will power, and you’ll be dialling for a pizza while stuffing down a packet of biscuits. Gradual change allows you to get used to one small change, before embarking on another.   Each step becomes a new healthy habit, and before you know it, months have passed and your small steps have accumulated to produce a radical, life changing shift.

 

The easiest way of understanding how to lean into an alkaline diet is to focus on what you are eating now. Take a look at your plate each mealtime. What proportion is grains (bread, pasta, rice etc)? What proportion is animal protein (cheese, meat, fish, eggs)? What proportion is plants (veggies, fruit, nuts, seeds, beans, lentils)? For most of us vegetables and fruits make up the smallest portion on our plates.   Now look at what you drink and snack on. Coffee, fizzy drinks, biscuits, crisps (don’t count as veggies I’m afraid!)? These will tip your daily intake further into the acidic pH (1-6).

 

If you need to readdress the balance, start taking steps to increase the amount of veggies you eat. Make your portion of grains and animal protein smaller, and fill up on veggies. Not only are they alkaline, they’re also packed full of nutrients. So while you’re making your digestive system smile by soothing it with alkaline foods, you’re also making your body smile, because it has more nutrients to keep you healthy.

 

Although the terms acid and alkaline sound scientific (well they do to me!), the message here is one we all know well – eat more vegetables! It’s that simple. Fruit is healthy, but you don’t want to overload on it, it’s still sugar. Veggies are where it’s at. Try snacking on carrots and celery sticks between meals. Add a scoop of nut butter or tahini if you want to stay fuller for longer. Have some avocado on toast rather than jam. Make a smoothie and add soaked hemp, chia or flax seed instead of yoghurt, add veggies to it instead of fruit. Make your own kale chips. Try using different grains – millet, buckwheat, quinoa, amaranth. Add a squeeze of fresh lemon to your water (if you’re worried about the effects of citric acid on your teeth, drink through a straw). Start swapping in a herbal tea for one of your coffees.

 

Over time the proportion of acidic foods in your diet will drop, while the alkaline foods increase. Today my plate is piled high with veggies. I can sound smug about it, but it took a long time to get here, it didn’t come naturally, there was plenty of trial and error. And I still have those days when the veggies are forgotten and all I want is meat, chips and cake! Progress not perfection is the name of the game. Don’t beat yourself up if you take a step backwards, just recommit and keep learning. And remember stress causes acid in the body, so be compassionate with yourself. Making changes can be challenging, for all of us. Keep observing yourself and learning what works for you. You’ll find the veggies you love, and you’ll know the ones that you’re not going to touch, no matter how committed you are to your health. Make choices that work for you.

 

You can find charts on-line that set out the acid/alkaline food spectrum. They tend to have small variations but they’re a good place to start. See here and here to get started:

 

 

And if you need ideas for preparing and cooking tasty veggies the River Cottage, ‘Veg Every Day’ cook book is a good place to begin. Or check out Kris Carr on-line http://kriscarr.com/recipes/ If you’re training and need protein, check out iron-man champ Brendan Brazier’s website for plant based protein recipes http://myvega.com/vega-life/recipe-center/ (sign up for his newsletter and you’ll get regular ideas straight to your in-box). If you’re wanting to experiment with cutting down on dairy and wheat, check out the River Cottage’s new book, ‘Light and Easy’. There are loads of resources out there, so look around and find what tickles your taste buds and inspires you to get into action.

 

Visit Rose’s website here.

 

Rose Long is a Liverpool based Health Coach and Absolute Yoga practitioner. Rose has very kindly agreed to hold a couple of free workshops at Absolute Yoga:

 

Update your relationship with food – Wednesday 19th November 6 – 7.30pm

 

How to fuel a busy life – Wednesday 26th November 6 – 7.30pm

 

Places are free but booking is essential. To reserve a space, please telephone the studio on 0151 928 1029, email info@absoluteyogacrosby.co.uk or book at reception.

 

Share

Guest Blogger, Dan: Back on the Mat at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool) for Hot (and Cold?) Pilates

 

Forgive me for I have sinned, its been a REALLY long time since last we spoke.

 

This time its been nowhere near as exciting a trip as last time when there were datelines and oceans crossed and beaches laid upon. This time I’ve crisscrossed the country and reached the wild climes of  Milton Keynes. Don’t ask.

 

A new adventure on the wrong side of the Pennines has meant that I can get back to the home where my spirit gets to have a stretch along with my neglected body. Swift contact was made with Absolute Yoga and miraculously they said I could come again! The timetable has evolved and now my beloved, yes beloved, Hot Pilates class has been punctuated by Traditional Pilates.

 

So on a sunny September morning, Indian summer some may say, Yoga has Indian roots, new report about yogic-ness during Indian summer CHECK ME OUT, the Downward Facing Fatboy returned to Crosby. There was a hint of trepidation as this was a Traditional Pilates class, this means the room isn’t heated to the balmy conditions I have become accustomed to, and I like being warm. I shouldn’t have worried, firstly the room is still comfortable to move in its not what you would call cold. And secondly, Paula the teacher seemed intent on bringing the temperature of the room up through the exertions of the class alone.

 

After a warm up and stretch routine the class really began and it was immediately apparent to me that this was not the Pilates I was used to, the dynamism of the poses and the repetition of the movements were both increased over Hot Pilates with the same teacher. I later learned that because the room isn’t so hot it allows more dynamic movements with less chance of someone doing themselves a mischief. All in all this was a serious hours work, in my second Trad class we managed to generate enough heat to steam the mirrors up!

 

The familiar and welcoming heat of Hot Pilates was saved for Friday. A blessing after my DOMS related waddling on Thursday, evidence of the shape I’ve managed to get myself in following my early year dedication. I wasn’t quite back to square one but I wasn’t far off, no black outs but a few times I held plank instead of doing something more dynamic.

 

I’m looking forward to the week ahead, next up on my Yogic journey is Tri-Dynamic Yoga, despite my protestations to the newly qualified Fairy Yoga-PT-Mother about no weights. I’ll report back if my arms still work.

 

Namaste Kids

 

 

 

Read Dan’s previous blog here.

 

 

Pilates at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool)

 

The first class is free for new students and then choose from…

 

Special Offers for New Students

 

How to Book a Class at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool)
Email: info@absoluteyogacrosby.co.uk
Call: 0151 928 1029
Book a class online here

 

Find us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram…

                                   

twitter_icon

facebook_icon

instagram_icon

Share

Recommended Classes for New Students at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool)

 

If you are new to yoga or Pilates then please see below for a list of classes which we recommend for your first time on the mat with us. You may also wish to read our FAQ on yoga and Pilates at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool).

 

Monday 6.30pm: Gentle Hot Yoga with Jess


What to expect…

 


A relaxed and stretchy class, starting off on the mat and building up gradually to Sun Salutations followed by postures such as the Virabhadrasana asanas. Jess likes to start and end practice with some chanting which encourages the yoga students to feel peaceful, calm and tranquil. Also, d
uring class relaxation, Jessica often uses holistic therapy techniques such as aromotherapy, reiki and sound healing in Savasana so that students leave her class feeling re-aligned, re-balanced and re-newed. Accordingly, this class is recommended for beginners and also those who are currently experiencing stress, depression and/or anxiety. 

 

Tuesday 10.00am: Yin Yoga with Carli

 

What to expect…

 

Carli
Yin yoga, a Taoist tradition, allows us to access deeper layers of the physical body where connective tissue repairs itself, improving a free flow of energy inherent in us all. The pace of Yin yoga is quite slow and postures are held for 3-5 minutes. This class is mostly mat based with very few, if any, standing postures. Yin classes are much more meditative than classes such as Ashtanga yoga and so this class is also recommended for people seeking to manage day to day stress. 

 

Wednesday 10.00am: Traditional Pilates with Paula

 


What to expect.
..

 

Paula  in Side Plank (Vasisthasana): Strengthens the arms and core,  stretches and strengthens the wrists and improves balance.Our Wednesday and Sunday classes are all held in a non-hot room. Hot Pilates is great for really stretching out and challenging the body but it is also good to practise Pilates in a room temperature environment. In Pilates there is a strong focus on developing strength through core engagement. Students must learn how to breathe and when to breathe in a Pilates class. In a hot room, it can be difficult for a new student to concentrate on technique because they are trying to adapt to the temperature of the room and so their mind is more easily distracted.

 

This is not an easy class  – you will be worked hard! However, because Paula gives three levels to work at (beginners, intermediate and advanced) this class is suitable for new students. 

 

Wednesday 6.00pm: Traditional Yoga with Camilla

 


What to expect.
..

 

Our Wednesday and Sunday classes are all held in a non-hot room. Hot yoga is great for really stretching out the body but it is also good to perform the asana practice (the postures) in a room temperature environment. Connection with the breath is fundamental to yoga practice. In a hot room, it can be difficult for a new student to concentrate on making this connection because they are trying to adapt to the temperature of the room and so their mind is more easily distracted.

 

Camilla believes that yoga is not about physical strength or acrobatics but about spending time on your mat, sitting still, listening and ultimately experiencing the power of the present. Her classes accommodate all levels of abilities and include elements of basic breathing, pranayama, meditation and mantra.  

 

Thursday 7.30pm: Gentle Hot Yoga with Ryan

 


What to expect.
..


Ryan will take you through about four rounds of slow paced sun salutations and then move onto perform some gentle yoga postures. This class is a litte more fast paced than the Monday 6.30pm but is still fine for a beginner to attend. Ryan’s classes have a strong focus on alignment and he will adjust you in a posture in order to assist you in achieving the correct performance of a pose if needed. After you have tried a few gentle classes, try Ryan’s more challenging 6.15pm “Funky Beats” class. 

 

Friday 6.00pm: Candlelit Yoga with Carli

 


What to expect.
..

 

This is a Yin based class held in candlelight in order to promote a deep sense of relaxation and inner peace. The pace of Yin yoga is quite slow and postures are held for 3-5 minutes. This class is very gentle with few, if any, standing postures. This class is with Carli who believes that experiencing a deep sense of peace and well-being is the ultimate aim of yoga. The class runs on Fridays at  6.00pm and is a great way to unwind after a busy and stressful week.

 

 

Saturday 9.00am: Hot Yoga with Jo

 


What to expect.
..

 

Jo’s class is available to all levels and is perfect for beginners.  Jo’s style of yoga is formed on the basis of Hatha yoga, intertwined with some flow and a little hint of Yin.  In addition to asana (posture) practice, Jo’s classes include simple pranayama (breath work) meditation and relaxation.  Her aim is to accommodate all levels of abilities, wants and needs through the staging of postures, variation and ultimately making you feel welcome and wanting more from your yoga practice. Another great class for stress relief.

 

The first class is free for new students at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool) and then choose from…

 

Special Offers for New Students

 

How to Book a Class at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool)
Email: info@absoluteyogacrosby.co.uk
Call: 0151 928 1029
Book a class online here

 

Find us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram…

                                   

twitter_icon

facebook_icon

instagram_icon

 

Share

Some of the Yoga and Pilates Postures Practised at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool)

Gallery

    The first class is free for new students at Absolute Yoga, Crosby (Liverpool) and then choose from…       Find us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram…                       … Continue reading

Share

Updating Your Relationship to Food

Rose Long is a Liverpool based Health Coach and Absolute Yoga practitioner. Rose has very kindly agreed to write a few guest articles for our studio in the area of health, well being and nutrition. Research suggests that the food you eat is approximately 85% responsible for factors such as body weight and overall health. Accordingly, read on: what Rose has to say is very interesting…

Our relationship to food is as complex as any relationship that lasts a lifetime and, just like any healthy relationship, it’s good to update every once in a while.

 

What we eat and why we eat can be based on past conditioning and habits; we’re often unconscious as to why we reach for that slice of toast, crave a morning coffee or dive into a plate of pasta.  Even with our best intentions, food in today’s world is a complicated business.  I had a wake up call when I was diagnosed with thyroid cancer.  I considered myself a healthy eater, but I’d never updated my relationship to food and when I took a closer look, I was still acting out patterns deep rooted in my childhood.  Even though I knew that sugar feeds cancer, there were times when nothing else would do – birthday celebrations didn’t seem complete without a slice of cake, a holiday in the sun demanded an ice-cream and there were some days when I wanted a treat or felt like rewarding myself with indulgent sweet yumminess and nothing else would satisfy me.   I was shocked and surprised – just how much did I know about what I was putting in my body and why?  One thing became clear, I would eat for many reasons – flavour, convenience, boredom, to avoid, to comfort, to reward, to rebel, to fit in, to indulge, to energise – and although I made fairly healthy choices, my primary intention was not to nourish my body when it’s hungry – moods, lifestyle and convenience all came first.

 

The first step to updating your relationship to food is to bring awareness to what you eat.  You will begin to see patterns – I’d eat well at home, not so well when I was out, and damn right appalling when visiting my Gran!  Travel seems to give many of us permission to eat junk, as do celebrations like birthdays, Christmas and parties.  You may have certain friends you share a love of healthy food with, certain friends you indulge your love of unhealthy food.  As your awareness grows, you’ll be able to make new choices and break with some of the habits and patterns that no longer serve you.  For me and for people I’ve worked with it’s often a case of two steps forward one step back, but the small changes begin to build over time and you will reach a point when you know it’s doing you good – you’ll no longer crave sugar, carbs and coffee and you’ll most likely see a difference in energy, moods, skin, sleep and weight.

 

Because each of us is unique, there’s no one approach to food that is going to achieve results for all of us – hence the number of diet books on the market.  Our bodies know what we need, but most of us have forgotten how to listen to them.  Once we get over unhealthy cravings and habits we can learn to listen to our bodies and find what food works for us and update.  With renewed awareness and sensitivity we discover what energises us and what doesn’t, what leaves us feeling bloated or farting like a trooper and what food sits comfortably and digests well. 

 

Giving our attention to what we eat transforms the experience, not just because we really enjoy the tastes and textures of the food, but because of what it does for our bodies.  When I reach for my morning smoothie these days, it’s almost like my tail is wagging.  My body knows the goodness of what I put into my morning smoothie, and I take time to savour it.  But it took practice to give attention to my food, I was so used to eating at my desk, enjoying a TV dinner or eating on the go.  But when we are distracted we’re less likely to chew well and hear the body’s signal that we are full.  Research shows that most of us eat more when our attention is on something other than our food.  This is bad news for our digestive systems which become overloaded and unable to work efficiently.  This has consequences for our immune systems, and so our overall health.  How so?  Well 70% of our immune system is located in the gut, so slowing down, chewing and savouring the subtle flavours means we absorb all the goodness from the food we’re eating, and we avoid lumps of food getting stuck in our gut and festering.  The Indian Ayurvedic tradition suggests eating until we’re 75% full – that’s not going to happen if you’re watching someone cook up a storm on Masterchef while stuffing in a stir-fry!  In the practice of yoga, eating is another form of meditation and as Geneen Roth says, ‘Meditation is a tool to shake yourself awake.  A way to discover what you love.’.  What do you need to update in your relationship to food to deepen your love and appreciation of what you eat?

 

To find our more about my training please visit my website: www.roselong-lifechanges.com.  If you have any questions feel free to contact me: rose@roselong-lifechanges.com.

 

 

Read Rose’s previous article here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share